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Lebanon reverses move to ban Spielberg's 'The Post'

Lebanese authorities have reversed a decision to ban Steven Spielberg's newspaper drama "The Post" ahead of its opening in theaters across the country, a local cinema manager said Wednesday.

Lebanese censorship authorities had recommended the ban because the director is blacklisted by the Arab League over his support for Israel. After two months of marketing the film, theaters had taken the posters down and rolled back plans for a premiere.

Isaac Fahed, sales and distribution manager of the Grand Cinemas chain, one of Lebanon's largest, said the film will open in theaters on Thursday after "mediation" between the distributor and the Interior Ministry. He declined to elaborate.

Lebanese officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

Censorship authorities had recommended the ban, which required the interior minister's approval. The reversal of the ban is unusual. Lebanon is technically at war with Israel, and the movement to boycott Israel enjoys wide support in the country.

Fahed said the reversal was good news for the cultural scene in Lebanon as well as the boycott movement.

"It is not a commercial film and not an action film," Fahed said, adding that they were not expecting it to be a box office hit. "It is (good) for freedom of cinema and culture and for being fair and just in our defense against Israel and Zionism. There is an efficient way, not a stone age way.

"We are at war with the Israeli government, not with Jewish people or their ideology," he said.

Lebanon officially follows an Arab League blacklist against supporters of Israel and organizations and companies seen as promoting or doing business with the country. A leaked U.S. State Department memo from 2007 revealed that Spielberg was blacklisted by the League for donating $1 million to Israel for reconstruction during its 2006 war with Lebanon.

"The Post" is being shown in other Arab countries, where there have been no calls to boycott it.

The film, starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, tells the story of the Washington Post's efforts to publish the Pentagon Papers, classified documents that revealed the failures of the U.S. war in Vietnam.

Stella McCartney hopes fashion can have a 'Me Too' moment

Designer Stella McCartney is ready to see the Me Too movement sweeping Hollywood make its way to the runways.

"It's about time the fashion industry spoke up a little more," said McCartney during an interview Tuesday at a Los Angeles concert event showcasing her autumn collection.

"We are nearly 80 percent women in the company, but I also like men. So I'm a big believer in equality," said the British designer, who wore black to support the sexual misconduct defense initiative Time's Up.

Katy Perry, Christina Aguilera, Emma Roberts, Kate Hudson and Goldie Hawn were among the starry guest list.

"She just gives me the pallet and I paint with it and tonight I'm red!" said Perry while making her way into the party wearing a ruffled, flowy frock.

It was a family affair with Paul McCartney walking the red carpet before performing for the fashionable crowd.

The elder McCartney told reporters he was "super proud" of daughter Stella and joked that she got her sense of style from his former Beatles bandmate, Ringo Starr, who was also in attendance.

McCartney joined the band Muse onstage for Beatles' hits like "I Saw Her Standing There" and "Helter Skelter." Other performers included St. Vincent and Beck featuring the Compton Kidz Club choir.

Models were perched around the event space accentuating the rock concert setting with faded denim, funky animal prints and cozy sweaters. A neon Time's Up sign welcomed guests to Hollywood's S.I.R. Studios.

Sheer French lace showed up on slinky pastel slip dresses, sleeves and tracksuits. Leopard print ran throughout and a cinched-waist jumpsuit mixed red chevron with stripes. McCartney's men's line included preppy polo shirts and V-neck sweaters matched with patterned overcoats and relaxed track pants or jeans.

"It's approachable," said McCartney of the collection. "Naturally confident, naturally sexy and modern."

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Follow Nicole Evatt on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NicoleEvatt

Stapleton, Arcade Fire, Modest Mouse lead Forecastle lineup

Chris Stapleton, Arcade Fire and Modest Mouse lead the lineup for the Forecastle Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, along with Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Houndmouth and The War on Drugs.

The July 13-15 music festival held on Waterfront Park on the banks of the Ohio River is in its 16th year. Weekend passes go on sale on Friday, Jan. 19.

Additional artists include Father John Misty, Vance Joy, Courtney Barnett, NF, Jimmy Eat World, Kurt Vile and the Violators, Louis the Child and T-Pain.

50 shows, 5 days: Fashion says "bonjour" to Paris menswear

The traveling fashion press bid "ciao" to Milan and said "bonjour" to Paris on Wednesday as another week of menswear mania that will include 50 shows, endless parties and million-dollar deals got underway in the French capital.

Powerhouse Valentino unveiled its couture-infused fall-winter creations from designer Pierpaolo Piccioli on Day 1, which also featured collections by lesser-known houses such as Julien David and Facetasm.

Here are the some highlights:

VALENTINO'S ARISTOPUNK

The message from Piccioli's accomplished menswear show was simple: All rich kids should have a dose of rebellion.

The now-solo Valentino designer, whose designs have gone from strength to strength, channeled the concept of "Aristopunk."

With delicious contrast, white sneakers graced the luxuriant carpets inside the magnificent, 18th century-style Hotel Salomon de Rothschild. This was served up with bubble jackets in white and black and high zipped collars as acid yellow, neon pink and vivid blue added a dash of bold fun.

But there was much artistry at work, too, in the 48 dark, masculine and generally fitted looks. The beauty was captured best in the dandy-like swagger produced by a billowing shin-length coat style.

Panels separated the lower segments and as the models walked by, they fluttered stylishly like weighty, hanging petals.

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"STRANGER THINGS" ACTOR STEPS OUT

Twenty five-year-old Joe Keery shot to fame as Steve Harrington in the hit American science-fiction horror TV series, "Stranger Things."

And now he's hit the fashion circuit.

Decked out in a sartorial-sportswear black Valentino jacket, the actor and musician seemed to enjoy the moment, chatting animatedly to front row guests, whom also included actor Mark Ruffalo.

Keery confirmed this was indeed his fashion show debut. "This is my first one of these, so I'm just dipping my toes in," he told AP. "I've no idea. I'm just going along for the ride."

Keery, who also starred in the Jessica Chastain movie "Molly's Game," said he's still yet to see the hit film, and called being chosen for the role of a trust fund kid "a surprise."

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JULIEN DAVID'S DOG-EAT-DOG WORLD

That fashion is a dog-eat-dog world was perhaps the message from French designer Julien David, whose models for fall-winter previews all donned comic canine masks.

The looks — featuring huskies, Dalmatians, poodles and bulldogs — endowed David's 22 designs with a sense of surreal fun and dog-style relaxation. The models posed during Wednesday's 'show' sitting on chairs next to tables decorated with cards games and dominos, or slouched on a couch, as fashion insiders chuckled and snapped their cameras.

It was clever stage-managing by David, one of the rising stars in Paris menswear, to highlight his signature casual style. His clothes — baggy denims with turn-ups that revealed pulled-up wooly socks and white-laced sneakers — were just that.

Dungarees in deep indigo were worn over a utilitarian golden brown toggle sweater, and lined boots had big eyelets — riffs in Paris on the workmen styles that have been ubiquitous on the Milan runway shows.

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CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE EVOKES A MASCULINE AIR

Wearable, fashion-forward and minimalist. That's the successful mantra employed by former-Hermes designer Christophe Lemaire and it was used with aplomb for his stylish fall-winter show brimming with clean lines and loose silhouettes.

There were nods to the utilitarian trend with boots, buttons, big flat pockets and boxy workers' jackets. And a strong masculine air was evoked, in this 40-piece collection, thanks to its autumnal color palette of smoke, slate gray, black, drab and golden brown.

Lemaire's clever use of round shoulders and soft fabrics evoked comfort and ensured that the hardy elements of his designs were never overpowering. Sometimes they almost fused into the gentle mottled-paint decor.

A flash of white — in baggy pants — may well have reflected the fall sky's occasional fluffy cloud.

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FACETASM DELIVERS CONTRASTS

Facetasm took the on-trend worker style as its starting point for a fall-winter collection that was ultimately hard to pin down.

Japanese-style thick denim fabric was given a great scrunched-up effect in a round-shouldered bomber with oversize proportions and baggy jeans. It was twinned with a black hoodie, which had a raw street-wear vibe that resonated with the show's warehouse venue and its wrought-iron columns.

The Tokyo-founded company has won plaudits for its conceptual styles with hints of punk — but Wednesday's show sometimes lacked focus.

Oversized garments, one of the show's major themes, were delivered with a dark palette that was cut with occasional bold colors — acid green, neon blue, lemon yellow or bright red. Several designs — like a big pale blue winter coat — riffed on the '80s.

The name of the house was based on its founder Hiromichi Ochiai's idea of the varying angular sides of a diamond — angles that seem contrasting that yet produce an inner harmony. Their show Wednesday was highly creative but could have done with less of the contrasts and more of the harmony.

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Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey's widow files wrongful death lawsuit against New York hospital

The widow of late Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey is suing the New York City hospital that treated her husband before his death in 2016.

According to Reuters, Cindy Frey filed a lawsuit Tuesday accusing Mount Sinai Hospital and gastroenterologist Steven Itzkowitz of negligence while treating the musician, who had ulcerative colitis, in late 2015.

>> Read more trending news 

The wrongful death lawsuit alleges that "Frey was rendered sick, sore, lame and disabled" because Itzkowitz and the hospital did not properly diagnose, treat or disclose the risks of treatment to him, Reuters reported.

Frey died Jan. 18, 2016, after suffering "complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia," the band said in a statement at the time. He was 67.

Eagles manager Irving Azoff previously told The Wrap that rheumatoid arthritis medications were partly to blame for Frey's death.

“The colitis and pneumonia were side effects from all the meds,” Azoff said

Cindy Frey is seeking "unspecified damages," Reuters reported.

Read more here.

France to loan Britain famed 11th-century Bayeux Tapestry

French officials plan to loan the historic Bayeux Tapestry to Britain, allowing the 11th-century artwork depicting the conquest of England to leave France for the first time in centuries.

The mayor of the Normandy town of Bayeux, Patrick Gomont, said Wednesday that the loan is about five years away because restoration work is required to ensure the fragile 70-meter (230-foot) cloth isn't damaged in transit. It currently resides in a museum in the town.

The Times of London newspaper reported that French President Emmanuel Macron will announce the loan of the artwork on Thursday when he meets British Prime Minister Theresa May for talks on Brexit, security and border issues.

The tapestry is a both a treasured work of medieval art and a valuable historical document that depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England by William the Conqueror in 1066. It last left Normandy during World War II, when it was moved to Paris.

Conservative British lawmaker Tom Tugendhat, who heads Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee, said the loan was a "fantastic gesture of goodwill" by France.

Levi Roach, a medieval historian at the University of Exeter, said the tapestry was a symbol of the "close yet fraught" relationship between Britain in France. Its loan is especially resonant as Britain prepares to leave the European Union and strike up new relationships with its European neighbors.

"It is very significant that the Bayeux Tapestry is going to be coming to the United Kingdom and that people are going to be able to see this," May told lawmakers in the House of Commons.

May's spokesman would not comment on whether Britain planned to loan France anything in return.

The venue where the tapestry will be displayed in Britain hasn't been announced. The director of the British Museum said he would be "honored and delighted" to put it on show.

"This would be a major loan, probably the most significant ever from France to the U.K.," museum director Hartwig Fischer said.

The tapestry depicts the invasion from the victorious French standpoint, but many historians believe it was stitched in England.

Chrissy Teigen offers to pay McKayla Maroney's possible $100K fine to speak out about team doctor

One after one, gymnasts and other victims of former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, 54, stepped forward in a Michigan courtroom Tuesday to recount the sexual abuse and emotional trauma they say he inflicted on them as children.

U.S. Olympians Simone Biles, Aly Raisman and Gabby Douglas are among the many women to accuse Nassar of abuse.

>> Read more trending news 

Nearly 100 victims are expected to address the court during the four-day sentencing hearing. 

However, former gold medalist McKayla Maroney may not speak out.

In December 2016, Maroney signed a confidential settlement with the group that trains U.S. Olympic gymnasts to keep allegations that she was sexually abused by Nassar a secret.

The settlement included nondisclosure and non-disparagement clauses and Maroney or her parents could be sued for more than $100,000 for violating the agreement. The suit seeks to invalidate those provisions under a California law that prohibits settlements in civil cases that could result in criminal sex offense charges.

Chrissy Teigen, who is from Snohomish, Washington, is offering to pay Maroney's possible fine so Maroney can speak out against Nassar. 

On Tuesday, Teigen tweeted the following about the fine:

"The entire principle of this should be fought – an NDA to stay quiet about this serial monster with over 140 accusers, but I would be absolutely honored to pay this fine for you, McKayla."

Maroney said Nassar's abuse started in her early teens and continued for the rest of her competitive career.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

More actors expressing regret about working with Woody Allen

A growing number of actors are distancing themselves from Woody Allen and his next film, heightening questions about the future of the prolific 82-year-old filmmaker in a Hollywood newly sensitive to allegations of sexual misconduct.

Timothee Chalamet on Tuesday said he will donate his salary for an upcoming Woody Allen film to three charities fighting sexual harassment and abuse: Time's Up, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN. The breakout star of "Call Me By Your Name" announced on Instagram that he didn't want to profit from his work on Allen's "A Rainy Day in New York," which wrapped shooting in the fall.

"I want to be worthy of standing shoulder to shoulder with the brave artists who are fighting for all people to be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve," said Chalamet.

Chalamet is just the latest cast member of an Allen production to express regret or guilt about being professionally associated with the director. In recent weeks, Rebecca Hall ("A Rainy Day in New York," ''Vicky Cristina Barcelona"), Mira Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite"), Ellen Page ("To Rome With Love"), David Krumholtz ("Wonder Wheel") and Griffith Newman ("A Rainy Day in New York") have all in some way distanced themselves from Allen or vowed that they wouldn't work with him again.

Dylan Farrow, Allen's adopted daughter, in 2014 renewed the claim that Allen molested her in an attic in 1992 when she was seven. Allen, who has long denied the allegations, was investigated for the incident but not charged.

The rising chorus of actors renouncing Allen suggests the road ahead for the him may be particularly challenging, even for a director whose personal controversies have for decades made him an alternatively beloved and reviled figure in movies. Financial support for the filmmaker has not previously waned in part because of the eagerness many stars have for working with a cinematic legend. But fielding a starry cast may prove increasingly difficult for Allen in a movie industry in the midst of a "Me Too" reckoning.

"If I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in the film," Greta Gerwig, who co-starred in Allen's 2012 comedy "To Rome With Love," told The New York Times last week . "I have not worked for him again, and I will not work for him again. Dylan Farrow's two different pieces made me realize that I increased another woman's pain, and I was heartbroken by that realization."

New remarks by Farrow were aired Wednesday as a prelude to what "CBS This Morning" calls her first on-camera discussion of the issue.

"Why shouldn't I want to bring him down?" she said in response to a question. "Why shouldn't I be angry? Why shouldn't I be hurt? Why shouldn't I feel some sort of outrage ... after all these years, being ignored and disbelieved, and tossed aside?"

Asked why she hopes people will believe her now, she replied, "I suppose that's on them. All I can do is speak my truth."

Farrow has previously questioned why the "Me Too" movement hasn't ensnarled Allen. In an op-ed published last month in The Los Angeles Times , she wrote: "Why is it that Harvey Weinstein and other accuseelebrities have been cast out by Hollywood, while Allen recently secured a multimillion-dollar distribution deal with Amazon, greenlit by former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price before he was suspended over sexual misconduct allegations?"

Price, the former head of Amazon Studios, resigned in October following an allegation that he had sexually harassed television producer Isa Hackett while she was working on the Amazon series "The Man in the High Castle."

"A Rainy Day in New York" is the fourth project for Allen with Amazon, which bet heavily on the filmmaker to help establish its film production arm as a home to auteur filmmakers. It reportedly spent $80 million to lure Allen into television to make the 2016 series "Crisis in Six Scenes."

Amazon, which didn't respond to queries Tuesday, also distributed Allen's "Cafe Society" in 2016 and "Wonder Wheel," which opened December 1. It has grossed a mere $1.4 million domestically on an estimated budget of $25 million but had more success overseas, grossing $7.8 million.

"A Rainy Day in New York," a romantic comedy due out sometime this year, also stars Selena Gomez, Jude Law, Liev Schreiber and Elle Fanning. In his statement, Chalamet tellingly noted that due to "contractual obligations" he couldn't comment on the long-standing allegations against Allen.

The announcement by Chalamet, a favorite Oscar contender for best actor this year, followed a similar one Friday by his co-star Hall. She said she was donating her salary from the film to Time's Up, the recently formed initiative to combat gender inequality in the entertainment industry. "It's a small gesture and not one intended as close to compensation," Hall wrote on Instagram.

Some have continued to publicly support Allen, though, including Alec Baldwin.

"Woody Allen was investigated forensically by two states (NY and CT) and no charges were filed," Baldwin said Tuesday on Twitter. "The renunciation of him and his work, no doubt, has some purpose. But it's unfair and sad to me. I worked with Woody Allen three times and it was one of the privileges of my career."

Australian actress Jessica Falkholt dies after car crash

Australian actress Jessica Falkholt died in a Sydney hospital on Wednesday, three weeks after a two-car collision that had already claimed four lives including three members of her family.

The 29-year-old, who played Hope Morrison in more than a dozen episodes of the long-running drama "Home and Away" in 2016, died six days after her life support was withdrawn, St. George Hospital said in a statement.

Falkholt was the last survivor of a Dec. 26 head-on collision on the coast south of Sydney that instantly killed her parents Lars and Vivian Falkholt and the sole occupant of the second car, Craig Whitall.

The actress's 21-year-old sister Annabelle died In the hospital three days later.

Jessica Falkholt stars in an Australian movie "Harmony" that is due for cinema release this year.

Hundreds of mourners gathered in a Sydney church a week ago for the funerals of the three Falkholt family members.

The Latest: Angela Lansbury, 92, schools young actors

The Latest on upcoming programming from the TV Critics meeting in Pasadena, California (all times local):

5:46 p.m.

Angela Lansbury has words of wisdom for young actors.

Lansbury, 92, who plays crusty Aunt March in PBS' new adaptation of "Little Women," advised newcomers to learn everything they can about a character to avoid just spouting words.

Actors who fail to approach their work thoughtfully will end up "a flash in the pan," Lansbury said.

"It's terribly important to get out of yourself and into that character. Leave yourself at home," she told a TV critics meeting Tuesday.

The two-part adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's classic novel, debuting May 13 on PBS' "Masterpiece" showcase, stars Maya Hawke, daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman, in her screen debut. She plays aspiring writer Jo March.

Hawke called it a "huge gift and a huge honor" to work with Lansbury and Emily Watson, who plays Jo's mother, Marmee.

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11:28 a.m.

PBS will air a five-part series about the sexual misconduct crisis.

PBS chief executive Paula Kerger said Tuesday will address the burst of attention to the issue and how it can be used to produce "positive and lasting change."

"#MeToo, Now What?" will be hosted by Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International, a humanitarian organization. The debut date is Feb. 2.

PBS said the series will include reporting and conversations on topics including how race and class figure into the issue. Studio guests will include men and women from across the country, along with activists, and leaders from media, business and other sectors.

The Me Too unity movement was triggered by allegations of sexual misconduct against prominent men including Harvey Weinstein.

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