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Stephen Hawking’s ashes to be interred near graves of Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin

The ashes of renowned scientist Stephen Hawking will be interred at Westminster Abbey in London.

BBC reported that Hawking’s family said a private funeral service would be held March 31 at Church of St. Mary the Great, in Cambridge, England.

According to a spokesman for the abbey, Hawking will be interred near the grave of Sir Issac Newton, The Guardian reported.

>> Read more trending news 

“It is entirely fitting that the remains of Prof Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists,” the very Rev. John Hall, the dean of Westmister, said. “Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the abbey in 1727. Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.

“Other famous scientists are buried or memorialised nearby, the most recent burials being those of atomic physicists Ernest Rutherford in 1937 and Joseph John Thomson in 1940.

“We believe it to be vital that science and religion work together to seek to answer the great questions of the mystery of life and of the universe.”

Hawking died peacefully March 14 at age 76.

Former NFL star Ricky Williams launches marijuana brand 

Football never took too kindly to Ricky Williams’ affection for marijuana, but in his new business, it’s essential.

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The former running back, who won the Heisman Trophy in 1998 while at the University of Texas, is launching his own brand of marijuana.

Williams, who played for three teams during an 11-year NFL career, now lives in Venice Beach, California, where the drug has been decriminalized.

He is going into business with a product line called Real Wellness by Ricky Williams, a play off his initials.

Williams, 40, is promoting his goods for health reasons.

“I am known as a professional football player,” Williams told The South Florida Sun-Sentinel. “In the last 14 years, I have been educating myself and training as a health care practitioner.”

Williams is in business with OutCo, a dispensary and consulting firm in California. They plan to sell marijuana in dispensaries in Southern California and online.

Williams’ marijuana use led to suspensions from the NFL in his playing days, but Williams was a workhorse for the Miami Dolphins in the early 2000s, including a team-record 1,853 rushing yards in 2002. He also gained 1,372 yards in 2003.

“When people think about Ricky Williams, they think about a pothead,” he told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “That’s not fair to how I played the game. I was a physical player who was respected by my opponents and teammates. That gets lost with the off-the-field stuff.”

Minneapolis policeman charged in death of Australian woman

A Minneapolis police officer was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter Tuesday in the shooting death of an Australian woman last July, the Star Tribune reported.

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A warrant was issued Tuesday morning for the arrest of Mohamed Noor on charges related to the shooting death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond. Noor was booked into the Hennapin County Jail and bail was set at $500,000, the Star Tribune reported.

The case drew international attention and led to the ouster of Police Chief Janeé Harteau, the Minneapolis newspaper reported.

Damond, 40, was shot and killed July 15 after calling police to report a possible assault behind her south Minneapolis home, the Star Tribune reported. Noor was in the passenger seat and fired across his partner, Matthew Harrity, killing Damond, the newspaper reported.

Brother of Parkland gunman held on $500K bond, accused of trespassing at Stoneman Douglas

Update 1:50 p.m. EDT, March 20: Bond was set at $500,000 for Zachary Cruz following his arrest Monday near Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, where his older brother, Nikolas, killed 17 people Feb. 14.

State officials said the younger brother had trespassed at the school three time since the mass shooting.

>> Read more trending news 

A state prosecutor had originally asked for bond to be set at $750,000. Standard bond is $25 for trespassing charges.

Among other stipulations imposed by the court, Zachary Cruz will not be able to visit his brother in jail.

Also, the Lake Worth-area home where Zachary lives will be searched for weapons, Judge Kim Theresa Mollica ruled.

State prosecutor Sarahnell Murphy said that in jailhouse conversations, Zachary Cruz has told Nikolas “how popular” he is now and “how many girls he’s capable of attracting” after the mass shooting.

Original report: The brother of confessed school shooter Nikolas Cruz was arrested Monday afternoon for trespassing on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas campus in Parkland, according to the Broward County Sheriff’ Office. 

Zachary Cruz, 18, told deputies he went to the campus to “reflect on the school shooting and soak it in,” according to the arrest report. 

The sheriff’s office said he rode his skateboard through the campus, passing all locked doors and gates. Deputies said he was previously warned by school officials to stay away from the campus. 

The sheriff’s office said Zachary Cruz has no connections to Broward County at this time. Before the shootings, he lived with his brother and family friend, Rocxanne Deschamps, in a Lantana-area mobile home. 

>> Related: Florida school shooting timeline: Seven minutes, three floors and 17 dead

Nikolas Cruz, 19, is charged in a 34-count indictment with killing 17 people and wounding 17 others. He is being held without bail at the Broward County Jail after the Feb. 14 school shooting that left 14 students and three adults dead. 

After the fatal shootings, Zachary Cruz was put under a mental-health evaluation. He told investigators that as he drove home with Deschamps after he heard about the shootings he said, "I don't want to be alive. I don't want to deal with this stuff."

>> Related: Florida school shooting: What we know about the victims 

He has denied wanting either to kill or harm himself. 

World’s last male northern white rhino dies

The world's last male northern white rhinoceros has died, CNN reported.

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Sudan, a 45-year-old rhino, was euthanized by a veterinary team after his health deteriorated, according to the conservation group WildAid. The rhino was being treated for age-related issues and multiple infections, CNN reported.

Sudan lived in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.

“He was a gentle giant, his personality was just amazing and given his size, a lot of people were afraid of him. But there was nothing mean about him,” said Elodie Sampere, a representative for Ol Pejeta.

There are now only two females left in the subspecies. Researchers were able to save some of Sudan's genetic material, hoping for success in artificially inseminating one of the two females left, Sampere said.

Serial bomber Ted Kaczynski kept feds at bay for 17 years before capture

With the person or people responsible for five package bombs that have exploded in or around Austin still at large, local and federal authorities are reminded of the “Unabomber” -- Theodore “Ted” Kaczynski -- a serial bomber who remained elusive for nearly 20 years until he was turned in by his own brother. 

At the time, it was the longest and most expensive manhunt in FBI history. 

The FBI describes Kaczynski on its website as a “twisted genius” who wanted, and nearly succeeded in becoming an untraceable bringer of death and destruction. Ultimately, he killed three people and wounded 24 others. 

“How do you catch a twisted genius who aspires to be the perfect, anonymous killer -- who builds untraceable bombs and delivers them to random targets, who leaves false clues to throw off authorities, who lives like a recluse in the mountains of Montana and tells no one of his secret crimes?” the FBI website stated

Kaczynski was indeed a genius, with an IQ of 167. According to Crime Museum, an educational resource that provides an online crime library and operates the Natalee Holloway Resource Center, Kaczynski graduated from high school at 15 and entered Harvard University. By age 25, he had a doctorate in mathematics. 

He became the youngest professor ever hired by the University of California at Berkeley, but the demands of academia were too much for his shy, reserved nature. Kaczynski returned to his native Montana in 1969 and two years later, moved into his infamous cabin in Lincoln, from which he carried out his deadly rampage. 

Kaczynski first came to the attention of the FBI in 1978, when he sent his first crude bomb to Northwestern University near Chicago. Over the next 17 years, his targets included universities -- including UC Berkeley -- airlines and businesses, which he blamed for destroying the environment and over-industrializing the United States. 

That’s where the Unabomber moniker originated: “University and Airline Bomber,” Crime Museum reported

That first primitive bomb at Northwestern did little damage, causing only minor injuries to the police officer who -- alerted by the professor who received the suspicious package -- opened it. Like the bomber or bombers in Austin, however, Kaczynski’s package bombs became more sophisticated over time. 

Related: Unabomber: TV shows, movies and books about Ted Kaczynski

He was also meticulous and -- in covering his tracks -- would plant fake evidence inside the bombs to send investigators down the wrong path. One of the only clues in the case was a police sketch, based on witness statements, of a man wearing a dark hoodie and sunglasses. 

Those items, along with other personal items belonging to Kaczynski, were auctioned off in 2011, with proceeds to benefit his victims and their families. Collectors paid more than $200,000 for 58 items. 

Business Insider reported that between 1978 and 1995, when he was captured, Kaczynski arranged 16 bombings, including one that was placed in the cargo hold of an airplane. 

That bomb failed to detonate. 

Kaczynski’s first murder came in 1985, when John Hauser opened a package mailed to his Sacramento computer store, Crime Museum said. Hauser died from injuries inflicted by shrapnel.

The Unabomber sent just one device between 1986 and 1993, at which time he restarted his spree. He killed his second victim in 1994.

Thomas Mosser was an executive for the public relations firm that represented Exxon after the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989, Crime Museum reported. 

Kaczynski’s final bomb was sent a year after Mosser was killed. That bomb claimed the life of Gilbert Brent Murray, a lobbyist for the California Forestry Association. 

That same year, 1995, Kaczynski mailed a manifesto titled “Industrial Society and Its Future” to the New York Times and the Washington Post, Crime Museum reported. In the document, he derided the Industrial Revolution and called for people to eschew the technology he saw taking over their lives. 

Kaczynski demanded the newspapers publish the manifesto or else the carnage would continue. 

The FBI was hesitant to publish the 35,000-word document, debating the merits of “giving in to terrorists,” the FBI website said. Ultimately, then-FBI director Louis Freeh and then-Attorney General Janet Reno gave the go-ahead for the Times and the Post to publish the Unabomber’s words. 

Read the text of Kaczynski’s manifesto here. 

The hope was that someone would recognize his words and his views. Their wish was granted when, among the thousands of people who called in tips, they heard from someone who knew Kaczynski better than anyone: his brother.

David Kaczynski wrote in Psychology Today in 2016 that it was initially his wife, Linda, who, after hearing descriptions of the as-yet-unpublished manifesto, suspected her brother-in-law could be the Unabomber. He was initially skeptical of her suspicions, he said. 

“This was my brother she was talking about,” David Kaczynski wrote. “I knew that Ted was plagued with painful emotions. I’d worried about him for years and had many unanswered questions about his estrangement from our family. But it never occurred to me that he could be capable of violence.”

The manifesto was published a month later and, reading it on a computer at the public library in Albany, New York, David Kaczynski was “immobilized” by the time he finished the first paragraph. 

“The tone of the opening lines was hauntingly similar to that of Ted's letters condemning our parents, only here the indictment was vastly expanded,” David Kaczynski wrote. “On the surface, the phraseology was calm and intellectual, but it barely concealed the author's rage. As much as I wanted to, I couldn't absolutely deny that it might be my brother's writing.”

David and Linda Kaczynski spent two months comparing the manifesto to letters David Kaczynski had received from Ted Kaczynski over the years. Convinced there was a 50 percent chance that his brother penned the manifesto, David Kaczynski struggled with what to do. 

He feared a confrontation between law enforcement and his emotionally unstable brother could end badly, he wrote. He also feared what the situation could do to their elderly mother. 

He at last decided that his suspicions needed to be shared, and he went to the FBI. The Kaczynski brothers’ mother, though distraught, kissed him on the cheek when she found out. 

“I know you love Ted,” she said, according to David Kaczynski. “I know you wouldn’t have done this unless you felt you had to.”

The FBI reported that David Kaczynski confirmed several things that federal investigators already suspected about the Unabomber: that he’d been raised in Chicago, that he had ties to UC Berkeley and that he’d lived in Salt Lake City for a while before settling in the tiny cabin the brothers built in the woods in Lincoln.

The distraught brother also provided some of Ted Kaczynski’s writings, which an FBI linguistics analyst determined had been written by the author of the Unabomber’s manifesto, the FBI said

Investigators armed with a search warrant went to that cabin in the woods and arrested Ted Kaczynski. A search of his refuge turned up bomb components, one live bomb ready for the mail and about 40,000 handwritten journal pages.

His journal described the Unabomber crimes and included details of bomb-making experiments, the FBI said

Kaczynski was indicted in April 1996 with three counts of murder and 10 counts of activity relating to creating and mailing the bombs. Crime Museum reported that his lawyers tried to get him to use an insanity defense to avoid the death penalty.   

Kaczynski refused. Instead, he pleaded guilty to the charges in January 1998 and was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

He now resides at the Florence Supermax federal prison in Colorado, which also houses fellow serial bomber Eric Rudolph. Rudolph bombed the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, as well as a lesbian nightclub there and two abortion clinics in Atlanta and Birmingham, Alabama. 

Three people were killed and more than 100 injured in Rudolph’s rampage. 

Florida teacher leaves 4-year-old home alone while she buys marijuana, deputies say

Florida elementary school teacher left a 4-year-old child alone while she went to buy marijuana, officials said.

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Marsha Dolce, 26, was arrested Saturday on charges of child neglect and marijuana possession, according to a Polk County Sheriff's Office news release.

Deputies responded to a Davenport apartment complex Saturday morning and found a 4-year-old child crying outside, wearing only a T-shirt and underwear.

Dolce, who teaches fourth grade at Laurel Elementary in Poinciana, eventually returned home and told deputies she had left to help a friend with car troubles. 

Deputies said they found marijuana in Dolce's home and text messages on her phone indicating that she had gone to Winter Haven hours earlier to buy the drug.

Child welfare officials removed the child from Dolce's home, authorities said.

Parents arrested after mother leaves kid home alone, goes to Florida, police say

Two parents from Lakawanna County, Pennsylvania, have been arrested after police said that the they left their two children home alone while the mother traveled to Florida.

The investigation started when police were alerted to a case of children who had been left alone for weeks. When they visited the home, they found a 10- and 11-year-old alone, in a home that had food, boxes, pills and trash on the floor, WNEP reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Police said that Nicole Sciortino told them that she was not far away, but then admitted that she was in Florida. She then told the authorities that the children’s father Vincent Licciardello was watching the children. 

>>Read: Police: Florida couple left child living alone in trailer for months

He told police he dropped them off at Sciortino’s home on March 5 and he would stop by over the following days to give the children food, WNEP reported.

Sciortino told police that she didn’t know that it was against the law to leave the children home alone.

Both she and Licciardello were arrested, charged with endangering the welfare of children and are free on $10,000 unsecured bail. The children are staying with friends of the family, placed there by children and youth services, WNEP reported.

Woman robbed of $10,000 jackpot in casino parking lot 

A woman who won a $10,000 jackpot at a Nevada casino was robbed in the parking lot early Monday, KUTV reported.

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Police said they have recovered most of the cash, which was in the woman’s purse. She was leaving the Montego Bay Casino in West Wendover, Nevada, shortly after midnight when the purse was ripped from her hands, KUTV reported.

According to court documents, Tad Marshall, 33, of Bountiful, Utah, is accused of approaching the woman and stealing her purse.

Police found Marshall in a Wendover, Utah, motel parking lot and asked him if he had taken the money, KUTV reported. While the casino is located in Nevada, the parking lot where the theft occurred is located in Wendover, Utah, the station reported.

According to court documents, Marshall told police that the money was “in the car under the driver’s seat.” Police said they found the cash where Marshall told them it was located, KUTV reported.

Marshall was arrested and booked him into the Tooele County jail on charges of felony theft and possession of drug paraphernalia, KUTV reported.

United suspends pet cargo service in wake of mix-ups, dog death

United Airlines is suspending its PetSafe pet cargo program while it reviews the program. 

The suspension comes after a series of pet-related incidents, including one death, on the airline.

>> Read more trending news 

The Chicago Tribune reported that United will honor reservations that have already been confirmed for the service, which books pets in the cargo section of the plane.

“We are conducting a thorough and systematic review of our program for pets that travel in the cargo compartment to make improvements that will ensure the best possible experience for our customers and their pets,” United spokeswoman Maggie Schmerin said in a statement to the Chicago Tribune.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the airline will stop taking reservations for the program until May 1.

Related: Dog dies on United Airlines flight after being placed in overhead bin

Spokesman Charlie Hobart told Bloomberg that part of the review of the program includes the airline considering which pets to accept. Bloomberg reported that United had previously been willing to transport dogs with an increased likelihood of in-flight death or injury, such as brachycephalic, of snub-nosed dogs.

On March 12, a French bulldog puppy died on a flight from Houston to New York when its owners said a United flight attendant insisted the pet be stored in an overhead bin. United issued a statement saying it took “full responsibility” for the death.

“This was a tragic accident that should have never occurred, as pets should never be placed in the overhead bin,” United said in a statement March 13. “We assume full responsibility for this tragedy and express our deepest condolences to the family and are committed to supporting them. We are thoroughly investigating what occurred to prevent this from ever happening again.”

Related: ‘She took him out and he was dead:’ Owners of dog that died in United overhead bin speak out

On Tuesday, a German shepherd named Irgo was mistakenly flown to Japan in place of a Great Dane. Irgo was supposed to go to Kansas, where his family was moving from Oregon. The dog was reunited with his family Thursday.

Related: Dog mistakenly sent on United plane to Japan reunites with family in Kansas

On Friday, the airline mistakenly had a pet boarded on a flight from Newark, New Jersey, to St. Louis. Flight 3996 was diverted to Akron, Ohio, when the error was realized, according to airline spokeswoman Maggie Schmerin. The animal was “safely delivered to its owner.” Compensation aas given to passengers on the diverted flight.

According to data from the Department of Transportation, United Airlines had the highest rate of airline reports on incidents involving loss, injury or death of animals during air transportation in 2017.

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