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Ex-CBS CEO Les Moonves to challenge severance denial

Former CBS CEO Les Moonves is fighting the company's decision to deny his $120 million severance package following his firing over sexual misconduct allegations.

Moonves is demanding binding arbitration proceedings to challenge the decision, CBS announced in a filing Thursday with the Security Exchange Commission.

The company's board of directors denied Moonves his severance last month after concluding that he violated company policy and did not cooperate with an investigation into the sexual misconduct allegations.

Moonves, one of television's most influential figures, was ousted in September after allegations from women who said he subjected them to mistreatment including forced oral sex, groping and retaliation if they resisted.

The former CEO's legal team declined to comment Thursday. His lawyer, Andrew Levander, has previously said that Moonves cooperated fully with the investigation, which was conducted by two outside law firms. Moonves has also denied any allegations of non-consensual sex.

Moonves, who had earned praise for turning around the fortunes of CBS when he took over as entertainment chief in 1995, had been one of the highest-paid executives in the nation, making about $70 million in each of the past two years.

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This story has been corrected to show that the CBS filing was made Thursday, not Wednesday.

Vuitton's Abloh celebrates Michael Jackson in Paris menswear

Louis Vuitton's designer Virgil Abloh transported celebrity guests at Paris Fashion Week to the graffitied streets of New York in a dramatic menswear ode to Michael Jackson.

Abloh, the first African-American to head a major European fashion house, used his unique platform Thursday to celebrate one of America's most globally recognized and celebrated black performers.

Here are some highlights of Thursday's fall-winter shows.

LOUIS VUITTON GOES OFF THE WALL

Model Naomi Campbell and actors Timothee Chalamet and Joel Edgerton seemed amazed to discover a reconstructed cityscape that evoked the King of Pop's famed music videos, all inside the Tuileries Gardens.

A young, skinny actor resembling the late Jackson as a boy drew applause as he ran and danced across the impressive set of a poor New York neighborhood.

No detail was spared.

Guests clutched their show invites that comprised a single bejeweled white glove, as their eyes were led past a Chinese business store, New York street signs, sidewalks littered with dead leaves, and a barber shop ending at a saxophonist playing on the street.

Campbell nodded to the beat of the soundtrack — an infectious checklist of Jackson's greatest hits that had some humming well after the show had ended.

"It's Michael Jackson. My hero," she exclaimed.

VUITTON'S ABLOH REVISITS JACKSON

It was the flamboyance of Michael Jackson as seen through the classical prism of Louis Vuitton.

The silhouettes of some of the late star's most eye-popping looks were taken by Abloh and revisited in a slightly more pared-down style.

A military jacket and large sash — that might have come across overly showy — were designed in a tasteful pearl-gray monochrome cashmere.

Elsewhere, a giant cropped jacket with stiff padded lapels was saved from excess with soft charcoal flannel twill.

The signature layering of the singer, who died in 2009, was ubiquitous in the 64-piece parade that went from the subtle to the not so subtle toward the end.

An overlaid silver parka coat in aluminum foil leather and a silver safety vest were among the most literal of the Jackson odes and recalled some of his most spectacular concert performances, as did the models who wore jeweled gloves.

Later in the show, Abloh made a series of prints based on a cartoon in Jackson's 1978 film "The Wiz" that became a cult classic among black audiences.

Abloh called his hero, Jackson, "the universal symbol of unity on the planet." Though touching, the collection could have perhaps done without the scarf shirts fashioned out of global flags that came across as a tad busy and somewhat obvious.

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RICK OWENS BLOWS A KISS

A brooding and saucy mood overtook lauded American designer Rick Owens in a 70s-style collection Thursday.

The show was entitled "Larry," after U.S. designer Larry LeGaspi, whose silver and black space looks were worn by rock groups such as Kiss.

The fall-winter show was very much an homage to the bombastic styles of LeGaspi, about whom Owens has written a book.

Tan, sienna, deep vermillion and lashings of black in the clothes were highlighted by sensually dappled lighting.

Excess was simply everywhere.

Enveloping retro shades, peaked shoulders, oversized sleeves, flares and David Bowie-style tight waists set the time-dial very much to the era of Glam Rock.

As if that weren't enough, Owens pushed the envelope further with painted white faces and inset leather appliques that resembled women's genitals. They contrasted purity with provocation.

LeGaspi "helped set a lot of kids like me free with his mix of art-deco sexual ambiguity," Owens said.

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ISSEY MIYAKE BRINGS THE WIND

The Franco-Japanese house of Issey Miyake put on a collection in homage to the wind.

In the fall-winter silhouettes, it was not the wind of an angry storm at work, but more a gentle breeze that served to curve and soften the clothes' shapes.

The result was a low-key affair by designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae.

A welcome sharpness did appear in the collection via its print detailing, but its power was diluted by the rounded shapes.

For instance, some jagged yellow diagonal motifs evoked the strong movement of wind — but the looseness of the suits and coats on which they appeared lessened the effect.

The prints were conceived by an Asian wax resistant dyeing technique called batik that the house frequently uses. Issey Miyake is one house that cannot be faulted for its use of cutting-edge fashion-making methods.

Elsewhere, another Asian technique, ikat — a sort of tie-dye — was employed to produce the collection's strongest pieces.

A silk-wool series sported beautifully defused white horizontal bands across icy blue-gray pants and shimmering coats.

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Thomas Adamson can be followed at http://twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

Prince Philip, queen's husband, uninjured after car accident

Queen Elizabeth II's husband, Prince Philip, was involved in a car crash Thursday while driving in rural England but was not injured.

Buckingham Palace said Philip, 97, was checked by a doctor after the accident and determined to be fine.

The palace said the two-car accident happened Thursday afternoon near Sandringham Estate, the queen's country retreat in eastern England.

Witnesses told the BBC Philip appeared "very shocked" and shaken after the collision, which caused the Land Rover he was driving to overturn.

Norfolk Police said the drivers of both cars, a Land Rover and a Kia, were given alcohol breath tests under routine procedures following a collision. The force said both drivers tested negative.

"The male driver of the Land Rover was uninjured. The female driver of the Kia suffered cuts while the female passenger sustained an arm injury, both requiring hospital treatment," the police force said in a state.

The two women from the Kia were treated at nearby Queen Elizabeth Hospital and discharged, the statement said.

Witnesses described seeing broken glass and debris at the scene. Police did not say how the accident happened. There was no indication anyone was arrested for a driving offense.

Philip had a passenger in his car, but the palace did not identify the person. It is likely the prince was traveling with a protection officer, a standard security procedure for Britain's senior royals.

Philip has largely retired from public life. He has seemed to be in generally good health in recent months.

He and Elizabeth, 92, have been on an extended Christmas holiday at Sandringham, one of her favored rural homes.

Grammys performers: Cardi B, Kacey Musgraves, Janelle Monae

Album of the year nominees Cardi B, Kacey Musgraves, Janelle Monae and Post Malone will perform at next month's Grammy Awards.

The Recording Academy announced Thursday that Shawn Mendes, Camila Cabello and Dan + Shay will also hit the stage at the Feb. 10 event. The Grammys will air live on CBS from the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Others battling Cardi B, Musgraves, Monae and Malone for album of the year are Drake, Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. and the Kendrick Lamar-curated "Black Panther" soundtrack.

Lamar is the top contender with eight nominations, followed by Drake, who is up for seven awards. Carlile and Drake's frequent collaborator, producer Boi-1Da, earned six nods, while Cardi B, Lady Gaga, H.E.R., Maren Morris and Childish Gambino scored five nominations each.

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Online: http://www.grammy.com

Study of Leonardo's 1st landscape finds he had 2nd thoughts

The first-ever scientific study of the oldest known drawing by Leonardo da Vinci has found that he added details to an earlier sketch of a countryside landscape, said the Uffizi Galleries, whose collections include the fragile work.

The Galleries said the 1473 "Landscape Drawing for Santa Maria della Neve" was taken on Thursday to a Florence restoration laboratory for study, which began right away with microscopic examination.

Aided by sophisticated, non-invasive instruments, such as infrared light, the experts on Thursday scrutinized the front of the drawing. Later they will study the back, where there is a sketch of a human figure, the prestigious Florence art museum said in a statement.

Art historian Cecilia Frosinini, who is supervising the scientific study, said that initial examination showed that Leonardo worked in two different phases.

"It's possible that Leonardo went back to the drawing in a second moment, maybe right after his studies of geology and rocks," she said.

The drawing, dated Aug. 5, 1473, in the upper left corner, depicts a bucolic scene, with a castle on a hill in the background and a valley dominating the design's center.

Leonardo is celebrated as a Renaissance genius who excelled as an artist and who had creative scientific curiosity as well.

Some have hypothesized that the drawing depicted an actual place in Leonardo's native Tuscany, or as Uffizi director Eike Schmidt said, "was a kind of 'photograph' of this or that valley, of these or those mountains."

But the discovery that Leonardo worked on the drawing in two distinct phases "tilts the scale toward interpretations that underline the imaginative aspect and the character of intellectual speculation by the artist," Schmidt said in a statement.

The Uffizi only occasionally displays the work, Leonardo's earliest known drawing, because it is so fragile. But on April 15 it will go on display for five weeks in Vinci, the artist's hometown, as Italy marks the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death.

The landscape, done when he was 21, is Leonardo's earliest known dated drawing. Until recently, it had also long been considered his earliest known dated artwork.

Then, in 2017, a painted terracotta tile was attributed to Leonardo. Painted when he was 19, it depicts the Archangel Gabriel and is dated 1471.

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Frances D'Emilio is on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/fdemilio

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Mary Oliver dies at 83

Mary Oliver, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet whose rapturous odes to nature and animal life brought her critical acclaim and popular affection, has died. She was 83.

Bill Reichblum, Oliver's literary executor, said she died Thursday at her home in Hobe Sound, Florida. The cause of death was lymphoma.

"Thank you, Mary Oliver, for giving so many of us words to live by," Hillary Clinton wrote in a tweet. Ava DuVernay quoted from Oliver's poem "Praying" and fans online shared their favorite lines.

Author of more than 15 poetry and essay collections, Oliver wrote brief, direct pieces that sang of her worship of the outdoors and disdain for greed, despoilment and other human crimes. One of her favorite adjectives was "perfect," and rarely did she apply it to people. Her muses were owls and butterflies, frogs and geese, the changes of the seasons, the sun and the stars.

"In my outward appearance and life habits I hardly change — there's never been a day that my friends haven't been able to say, and at a distance, 'There's Oliver, still standing around in the weeds. There she is, still scribbling in her notebook,'" Oliver wrote in "Long Life," a book of essays published in 2004.

"But, at the center: I am shaking; I am flashing like tinsel."

Like her hero Walt Whitman, whom she would call the brother she never had, Oliver didn't only observe mushrooms growing in a rainstorm or an owl calling from a black branch; she longed to know and become one with what she saw. She might be awed by the singing of goldfinches or, as in the poem "White Flowers," overcome by a long nap in a field.

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Never in my life

had I felt myself so near

that porous line

where my own body was done with

and the roots and the stems and the flowers

began

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Her poetry books included "White Pine," ''West Wind" and the anthology "Devotions," which came out in 2017. She won the Pulitzer in 1984 for "American Primitive" and the National Book Award in 1992 for "New and Selected Poems." In 1998, she received the Lannan Literary Award for lifetime achievement. Her fans ranged from fellow poets Stanley Kunitz and Rita Dove to Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush.

"Although few poets have fewer human beings in their poems than Mary Oliver, it is ironic that few poets also go so far to help us forward," Stephen Dobyns wrote of her in The New York Times.

Oliver was a native of Maple Heights in suburban Cleveland, and endured what she called a "dysfunctional" family in part by writing poems and building huts of sticks and grass in the nearby woods. Edna St. Vincent Millay was an early influence and, while in high school, Oliver wrote to the late poet's sister, Norma, asking if she could visit Millay's house in Austerlitz, New York. Norma Millay agreed and Oliver ended up spending several years there, organizing Edna St. Vincent Millay's papers. While in Austerlitz, she also met the photographer Molly Malone Cook — "I took one look and fell, hook and tumble," Oliver later wrote — and the two were partners until Cook's death, in 2005. Much of Oliver's work was dedicated to Cook.

Oliver studied at Ohio State University and Vassar College, but never graduated and later scorned much of her education as "a pre-established collection of certainties." She did teach at Case Western University and Bennington College among other schools, although much of her work drew upon her childhood and the landscape around Provincetown.

"I am not very hopeful about the Earth remaining as it was when I was a child. It's already greatly changed. But I think when we lose the connection with the natural world, we tend to forget that we're animals, that we need the Earth," Oliver, who rarely spoke to the press, told Maria Shriver during a 2011 interview for Oprah Winfrey's "O'' magazine.

"If I have any lasting worth, it will be because I have tried to make people remember what the Earth is meant to look like."

She wrote often of mortality, but with a spirit of gratitude and completion. In "Circles," she pronounced herself "content" not to live forever, having been "filled" by what she saw and believed. In "When Death Comes," she hoped that at the end of life she could look back and see herself as a "bride married to amazement."

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When it's over, I don't want to wonder

if I have made of my life something particular, and real.

I don't want to find myself sighing and frightened,

or full of argument.

I don't want to end up having simply visited the world.

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Entertainment Writer Mark Kennedy contributed to this report.

Fans buy 'Little House on the Prairie' star's memorabilia

More than 200 items belonging to "Little House on the Prairie" star Melissa Gilbert and her husband, Emmy-winning actor Timothy Busfield, have been purchased in an estate sale in Michigan.

Items sold in the American Eagle Auction & Appraisal Company online auction this month included a red wedding dress, signed memorabilia and awards Gilbert received, The Livingston Daily Press & Argus reported.

Interest in the sale exceeded expectations, said auction house owner Kenny Lindsay. The online auction catalog received about 58,000 views and more than 300 bids were placed.

"The amount of exposure the auction got was off the charts," Lindsay said, though he declined to disclose how much money was raised during the auction.

Lindsay said one standout item was a photograph signed by the cast of "Little House on the Prairie" that the Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Minnesota purchased for $1,200.

"Another cool piece was sheet music signed by composer David Rose, who wrote music and the theme song for 'Little House on the Prairie' ... it went for $1,100," Lindsay said.

Redford resident Stacy Luoma was one of the bidders. The 45-year-old took home a variety of items, including a nightgown, dresser, quilts and boots. Luoma said she grew up watching Gilbert, who is one of her favorite actresses.

"You're buying the story to go with it," Luoma said. "I don't think I would have bought as much as I did if it weren't them (Gilbert and Busfield)."

Gilbert and Busfield had been living in Livingston County since 2013, but relocated this year to New York City.

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Information from: Livingston Daily Press & Argus, http://www.livingstondaily.com

Gladys Knight to sing national anthem at the Super Bowl

Gladys Knight will sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" at this year's Super Bowl.

The seven-time Grammy Award-winner says she's proud to use her voice to "unite and represent our country" in her hometown of Atlanta.

The 74-year-old and the Pips were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. Her hits include "Midnight Train to Georgia" and "That's What Friends Are For."

Maroon 5 will be joined by Big Boi, Atlanta-based rapper from Outkast, and Travis Scott during the halftime performance.

CBS broadcasts this year's Super Bowl from Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Feb. 3.

NFL announces Gladys Knight will sing National Anthem at Super Bowl LIII

The NFL announced Thursday morning that Gladys Knight will sing the National Anthem before Super Bowl LIII at Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

>> Read more trending news 

Knight, a seven-time Grammy Award-winner, was born and raised in Atlanta

Knight, known as the Empress of Soul, is best-known for her No. 1 singles "Midnight Train to Georgia" and "That's What Friends Are For.”

Mitchell Zuckoff is writing book about 9-11 terror attacks

A best-selling author and former Boston Globe reporter is completing a project about the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Mitchell Zuckoff's "Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11" will be released April 30, HarperCollins Publishing announced Thursday. Zuckoff wrote about the 2001 attacks for the Globe. For his new book, he has combined numerous individual stories into what the publisher is calling a comprehensive and minute-by-minute account.

Zuckoff's previous books include "Thirteen Hours" and "Frozen in Time." He is currently a journalism professor at Boston University. His work also has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times.

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